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Long Arm Quilting Services


Here at Quilter’s Heaven, we've been providing long arm quilting services for our customers since April 2008. Maureen O'Connor, owner of Quilter’s Heaven, is the main operator of the machine. We use a computer-guided Statler Stitcher from Gammill to achieve precision not available with hand-guided machines.

Since the software for our Gammill machine is continually being upgraded, Maureen attends class once a month to educate herself on the most recent features and updates. These classes also afford an opportunity for assistance with projects as needed. We strive to produce only the finest quality work possible, turning away jobs we don't feel we can do well, and providing you with names of other long arm quilters that may be a better fit for your project.

In order to achieve the best results, we ask that the quilt tops you bring in be clean, pressed, free of pet dander and loose threads, front and back. Seam allowances should be pressed and dog ears trimmed. Any seams that were not crossed over by other stitching should be back-tacked or stay-stitched. Pieced borders should be stay-stitched around the edges within the ¼” to be covered by your binding.

There should be no open seams. Check your quilt pieces as you go and make sure all seams are sewn closed. This is crucial, as the long arm machine can't detect open seams and may get caught in them and do damage to the fabric.

Backing fabric needs to be six inches longer and wider than your top. The backing should be pressed. Use a 1/2" to 5/8" seam allowance if you need to seam and press your seam open. A 1/4" seam allowance stands straight up as soon as it is on the long arm. Back tack or stay stitch the seam allowance down to prevent unraveling.  Pressing the seam allowance is sufficient for smaller quilts. Larger quilts benefit from taking the extra step of either gluing down the seam allowance with water soluble glue or sewing them down with water soluble thread.  All the edges should be even. If they are not, trim them to be even.  This is to insure that the quilt backing is put on the long arm straight and not crooked.  Do not leave any selvages in your project, not even in the seam of the backing.  The selvage is more tightly woven and will pucker when washed.   Do not pin or baste your quilt top to the batting and backing.

Please let us know if you are entering your quilt in a show.

Things to consider:

You will need to select a quilting pattern, batting (if you're not providing it), and thread color. Because pricing is based on the finishing tasks you request, you'll want to carefully determine which aspects of the finishing you'd like to do yourself, and how much you want us to complete for you.

Our philosophy in pricing is to break down every step so you can do as much as you want to lower the cost of the project. The only thing we require you to buy from us is the thread. Contact us if you have any additional questions or would like more information.

Quilters Heaven’s Price List:


All over design moderate density 3 cents a square inch
All over design dense 4 cents a square inch
Custom design repeat blocks including border turn 5 cents a square inch
Custom design different patterns in blocks and/or pattern manipulation 6 cents a square inch
Thread- solid-Signature brand $3 a bobbin
Thread- variegated- King Tut brand $5 a bobbin
Thread change $7.50 per
Binding - to make $1 a foot
Binding - to machine sew $2 a foot
Binding - to hand sew $2 a foot
Labor for seaming the backing, pressing, grooming or trimming the top $20 per hour
Minimum charge $45
Basting Only
(so you can quilt yourself)
$25 & 1 cent a sq. in
New quilting pattern specifically for your project 50% of pattern cost

If you need batting we stock

  • Quilters Dream Cotton- Request Loft
  • Quilters Dream Blend
  • Quilters Dream Green
  • Quilters Dream Orient
  • Quilters Dream Wool

If you would like a different batting and we can special order it for you, we will.  Please give us a two week lead time.

FAQ


Why do loose threads on the back need to be trimmed?

First, if there are several threads, or a ball of dog hair, on the back of the quilt, it can get stitched into the quilt and cause lumps to form. Secondly, a single thread of a dark color can show through a light background and distract from your work.

What is the purpose of stay stitching?

Seams that are not secured come apart on the long arm machine. When you stay-stitch around the perimeter of your quilt, you keep the seams together.

Why does the backing have to be 6 inches bigger than the quilt top?

This allows us to pin the backing on the machine (top and bottom) and attach the clamps (side to side) which keeps the backing taut while quilting.